Tres Amigos updates

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Missed some updates.  Bottled the Thanksgiving Mead #2 on November 18th and it is delicious! I added Potassium Sorbate and used a clarifier, but didn’t give the clarifier enough time to work…so all of my bottles are plenty clear and pour clear if you go slowly, but there is still a bit of sediment on the bottom.  It’s okay, though because either way it is still delicious!  The spices worked out much more subtly this time which is what I was really going for.  Sweet and just the right aroma of Thanksgiving spices.  Final stats for Thanksgiving Mead #2:

  • Started: 1 September 2010
  • 1st Rack: 27 September 2010 into carboy
  • 2nd Rack: 22 Oct 2010, without spices into carboy
  • Yeast killed: 9 November 2010, (actually there are a fair amount of spices)  with Potassium Sorbate
  • Bottled: 18 November 2010

I also racked at some point the Cyser.  I don’t remember exactly when, I think it was in the middle of November at some point after I bottled the Thanksgiving #2, so I’m going to guess Sunday November 21st.  Stats:

  • Started: 8 October 2010
  • 1st Rack: 24 October 2010
  • 2nd Rack: 21 November 2010

And for the last amigo, I am racking the Spoon Mead today into a new carboy and it tastes just perfect.  Very sweet, a little bubbly, no fancy flavors or anything.  Although I don’t know if I can discern the difference in flavor between, say, a clover mead and a purple starthistle mead, I would like to say that the flavor of the honey came through.  Anyway, with age it will improve to even greater heights, and I think this will be a good showcase mead to people who don’t know it as well.  It is remarkably clear for only its second rack.  Stats:

  • Started: 4 October 2010
  • 1st Rack: 9 November 2010
  • 2nd Rack: 12 December 2010

 

Tres Amigos

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So I racked the purple starthistle batch and it is pretty heavenly.  Strangely not very dry, but it goes down very smooth and the raisins added a very nice kind of fruity/floral undertone to the batch, and the natural flavor of the honey really comes through.  However, while racking it, what do I find in the bucket?  The stirring spoon!  Whoops, I plan to re-name this batch the “Spoon Mead”.  Did I mention that it is delicious?

 

 

Anyway, here is a picture of the three meads that I currently have, the Tgiving Mead #2 on the left (just added potassium sorbate today), the cyser in the middle, and the Spoon Mead on the right.

 

 

 

 

Stats for Spoon Mead nee Purple Starthistle:

  • Started: 4 October 2010
  • 1st Rack: 9 November 2010

Stats for Tgiving Mead#2

  • Started: 1 September 2010
  • 1st Rack: 27 September 2010 into carboy
  • 2nd Rack: 22 Oct 2010, without spices into carboy
  • Yeast killed: 9 November 2010, (actually there are a fair amount of spices)  with Potassium Sorbate

 

Purple Starthistle

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It sounds fancy, and it probably is, but I bought some Purple Starthistle honey from Blue Ridge Honey in Lakemont, GA, which I’m now considering my local honey distributor since Bee Well Honey Farms stopped selling bulk honey (or at least have restricted it to seasonally).  I decided to keep it dry and I’m using Wyeast strain 4632 for this batch to try out something a little new.  I’m afraid I’m going to be a little low on the honey, but we shall see.  I still have another 2 lbs of honey to add if it is not sweet enough at the first rack.

Recipe:

  • 1 gallon (approximately 12 lbs) purple starthistle honey
  • handful of raisins
  • water up to 5 gallons
  • 1 packet Wyeast 4632 (“Dry Mead”)

And stats:

  • Started: 4 October 2010