Thyme in a bottle

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So I racked the metheglin I started about a month ago…the airlock was bored and it seemed fermentation had stopped so I considered it good to go. I tasted it and passed it by my sister and a friend, who both approved. My friend immediately suggested “thyme in a bottle?” and on the spot I decided it was destined to be the name of this batch. It’s coming along nicely as always, well-fermented, tasty, and alcoholic. No doubt though that it tastes very strongly of thyme–not in an overbearing way, but it is distinct. No hinting at anything. Racked it today and avoided most of the yeast and spices so it should mellow out nicely over the next couple months. A good change from the other (sweeter, fruitier) meads I’ve brewed this summer. Stats:

  • Started: 14 July 2011
  • First rack: 15 Aug 2011

Spent a lot of thyme on this batch

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So I started a batch I think a week ago. I’m guessing on this because sometimes I’m a bad homebrewer and don’t always log every thing I ever do. Shame on me, I will try to set up the recipe and stats regardless. It is currently bubbling away happily and it smells like I haven’t overdone it on the spices. For those paying special attention, I am going to start referring to mead with spices by its technical term, a metheglin. I’m also tagging this under “crazy ideas” since I’ve never done a batch with such savory spices before…the agave mead had sage in it (much to its benefit!) but the main flavor there was the agave.

Recipe:

  • 1gallon+1qt wildflower honey from bee well honey farm
  • 5tsp fermax yeast nutrient
  • 1/4tsp irish moss
  • water up to 5 gallons
  • 1/4c whole thyme
  • 2tbsp ground sage
  • 1 packet Lalvin EC-1118 “Pris de Mousse” yeast
Stats:
  • Started: 14 July 2011

South by Southwest

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I’ve started something kind of crazy: I’m fermenting agave nectar, a low-glycemic sugar obtained from the nectar of the agave plant.  If you distill it, you get tequila.  If you ferment it, you get something that I don’t know its name.  Add a little clover honey from Charlotte, NC to make sure everything works well, sprinkle in some sage to spice it a little bit, and you get “South by Southwest”, my most recent experiment.  Next batch I’m going to tone it back and go for a plain ol sweet mead again.

Recipe:

  • 1 gallon (=11lbs) agave nectar
  • 3/4 oz of fresh sage, chopped and sanitized in boiling water
  • 1/4 gallon (approx. 3 lbs) clover honey
  • 5 tsp fermax yeast nutrient
  • 4 gallons distilled water
  • 1 packet Lalvin K1-V1116 yeast, prepared according to the packet

And stats:

  • Started: 16 May 2010, 8:27p